2014 June 18 Wednesday
Mississippi Canyon, Gulf of Mexico
OWOC’s fourth Whale Shark search of 2014, and our first search with a tagging boat in the Mississippi Canyon area (WS4-MC2)

On this fourth search of the season for whale sharks, we were a few days late for the full moon because we had had to wait for calmer seas and better visibility.  The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries brought their research boat and divers, equipped with plenty of satellite tags for whale sharks.  Our plan was to meet them near the “Tinkerbell” platform (MC274 lease block), where they would be carrying out some research on tuna and other fish while they waited for us to find some whale sharks.  There had been a few reports from fishermen of whale shark sightings, but none had reported any aggregations, so finding them was going to be a long shot, but much more promising by air than by boat.

Here are maps showing our flight route today (in magenta).  Blue water and heavy storms forced us to remain farther east than the standard survey grid; and of course, when we work with a boat, we also restrict our area to points that the boat can reach easily. The icons show some of the more substantial sightings of fish, dolphin, sargassum, … and oil.  We’ve also overlaid today’s Mississippi Canyon flight with the first survey flight here from May 21, when we flew the entire survey grid. (See that report here.)

The sargassum was awesome again, and the wetlands were particularly beautiful as we threaded our way through many areas of thunderstorm development on the way back to New Orleans. We saw a pod of about 50 bottlenose dolphin west of the Tinkerbell platform and more dolphin with some very large fish jumping near the Medusa platform, but alas, no whales or whale sharks.  We also saw a lovely small group of white pelicans near South Pass.

About 60  nm downriver from New Orleans, we saw the federally-owned old Fort Jackson on the west bank. Its manicured lawns and easy road access contrasted strongly with the privately-owned, neglected Fort St. Phillip on the east bank.  Both were built during Andrew Jackson’s time for the War of 1812.  They were fortified and occupied during the Civil War and again during the Spanish American war.

Here are some of our favorite photos from today, followed by galleries of additional photos, and finally our detailed Flight Log.

Read the full article and see many more photos and video here!